Hemorrhoid Treatment - Colon and Rectal Cancer Screening (are you at risk?)

In the United States, colorectal cancer is the fourth most common cancer in men and women, yet it is the least talked about. Colorectal cancer is responsible for over 59,000 deaths every year, yet patients who have their condition diagnosed early have survival rates of 95%.

The American Cancer Society and the American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons recommend colonoscopy screening for anyone over 50 years of age.

Patients who are at higher-than-average risk of should most often have screening tests before age 50. This handy worksheet can give you an insight regarding your risk for colorectal cancer.   NOTE: This is not a foolproof diagnostic test. It does not and should not replace an examination by your physician.  

If you haven't been tested for colorectal cancer, now is the time.

Dr. Schneider has extensive experience testing for colorectal cancer. The procedure is painless, and produces good results quickly. Call or contact us for an appointment today.   

The following is a simple test which will help to identify your risk of developing colon and rectal cancer. It is not a foolproof diagnostic test. It does not and should not replace an examination by your physician.  

All of the items below are risk factors for colon and rectal cancer. Write down any of the risk factors that apply to you as well as the points assigned to that risk factor:

Family History

New research confirms that the genetic component is more significant than once thought. When we examine the genetic link, we consider only 1st degree relatives (parents & siblings). Has anyone in your family (mother, father, sister, brother) been diagnosed with:
 

Colon or Rectal Cancer

  1. One relative
  2. More than one relative
  3. None

10
15
1

Colon Polyps

  1. One relative
  2. More than one relative
  3. None
  4. Familial Polyposis

10
15
1
30

Colon cancer or polyps occurred in my family before age 40

 

  1. Yes
  2. No

30
1
 

Personal History

A person's personal history also plays a role in predicting future illnesses. Have you ever had:
 

Familial Polyposis

30

Colon Cancer

30

Colon Polyps

30

Rectal Cancer

30

Breast Cancer

3

Gynecologic Cancer

3

Radiation Treatment to the Pelvis

3

Inflammatory Bowel Disease (Crohn's, Ulcerative Colitis)

20

Rectal Bleeding or Positive Stool Test for Occult Blood

5

Change in Bowel Habits Lasting a Month

3

None of the Above Risk Factors

1
 

Age Factors

Age is one of the main risk factors in the development of colon and rectal cancer. Over 90% of these cancers occur in people 50 years of age and older.
 

Age

  1. Less than 40 years old
  2. 40 to 49 years old
  3. 50 years old or older

1
2
10

 

After you have completed the test, select the one answer above that gave you the most points and multiply that number by the age factor above. This will be you total point score:
 

Age Factor    x    Highest Risk Factor    =    Risk Score
 

Risk Score

less than 5
5 to 29
greater than 29

Average Risk
Moderate Risk
High Risk

 

Screening Recommendations
 

Average Risk

Should reassess their risk annually and plan for an annual test for occult blood in the stool and digital rectal exam after age 40; flexible sigmoidoscopy every 5 years after age 40 and colonoscopy every 10 years after age 50.
 

Moderate Risk

Are at significant risk for developing colon cancer in their lifetime and should consult their physician to develop an appropriate screening program. This may include an evaluation of the entire colon.
 

High Risk

Should be on a routine colonoscopy screening program.

 

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